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This Organization Takes Care of Critically Wounded Troops

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This post is sponsored by Paralyzed Veterans of America. All opinions are mine.

If you’ve been in the military community for even just a little bit, you know that there are a lot of different organizations that are working to help military families, service members, and veterans. It can be a little overwhelming, especially if you’re stressed out and truly need help from someone.

So, let’s talk about one of those organizations that is doing great things for service members and their families. Paralyzed Veterans of America (PVA) steps in to help service members and their families with spinal injuries. For many families, dealing with such a traumatic moment can be frightening, emotional, financially difficult, and emotionally straining.

PVA offers help for paralyzed service members and their caregivers. #ad

But PVA is there. In 1971, it became a congressionally chartered veteran’s service organization. (Others you might recognize are MOAA, Gold Star Wives of America, and the Red Cross.) PVA’s purpose is to improve the quality of life for people who have sustained a spinal cord injury or dysfunction by supporting them physically and emotionally.

Here’s what PVA does for service members

PVA is available to help the minute the injured service member returns to the US. They have a multitude of programs–many of them created to pick up where the VA or government had to cut funding or programs. They often stand in the gap between funding and necessity so that injured service members have the best possible chance to thrive, emotionally, physically, and professionally. Here’s just a snapshot of what PVA does:

  • Navigate their medical services
  • Access their benefits
  • Provide employment counseling and job training
  • Offer counseling and support
  • Rebuild confidence and cultivate camaraderie with others through adaptive sports

And caregivers?

For many wounded service members, the road to recovery is long. Some may always need assistance for the most basic of tasks. PVA also works to take care of caregivers–who are 96% women, 70% spouses or partners, and 17% veterans themselves, according to the National Alliance for Caregiving. Military caregivers are typically younger, which sometimes means that they have children, are still in college, or aren’t resourced or connected as well as someone older and more established might be.

PVA offers help for paralyzed service members and their caregivers. #ad

Consider helping PVA

This Memorial Day, consider sharing this information with a military family that could benefit from it. If you don’t know anyone who is experiencing spinal cord injury or dysfunction, think about donating to PVA so that they can help those who need support and care at a really important, vital point in their life.


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